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businesses and major corporations. what can we do for you? >> and now, "bbc world news. >> russia's orphans pay the price for a dispute between russia and americans. the gang rape that sparked outrage in india as the victims conditions deteriorate, the politicians look to restore order and offer support. how just 15 cigarettes in a lifetime can lead to cancer. welcome to "bbc world news." coming up, a little girl abducted by her father and taken to pakistan three years ago is now heading back to britain. also, the era of the third age on the silver screen. >> hello, thanks for being with us. russian president putin has signed a bill which bans americans from adopting russian children. the controversial move is said to be part of russia's retaliation against an american law that puts sanctions on officials suspected of human rights violations. some senior government officials in moscow have spoken out against that law, but supporters argue the ban's necessary, because some adopted children have faced abuse by american families. joining me from moscow now is steve rosenberg. steve, you said h
the confidence of its most important factor. russia's envoy for medalist affairs says the rebels are gaining control -- envoy for middle east affairs says the rebels are gaining control. washington congratulated the kremlin for waking up to reality. >> the aftermath of a bombing in a damascus suburb. syrian official media said a car packed with explosives blew up near a school in this district to the southwest of the total, and that at least half of the casualties were women and children. "we were going to school when the explosion took place. i do not know anything about my parents. they may have died." this man says the victims were all students, or going to their places of work. after the explosion, the ground was full of bodies. the state news agency has blamed the violence on terrorists, its name for the rebels intensifying attacks on the government. this was the latest in a string of bombings in and around damascus. for the first time, russia has acknowledged the possibility of the rebels winning the civil war in syria. the assad regime was losing control of more and more territory, an
to cover so let's get right to it. russia dominating our newscast this hour. for two very different reasons. first, the man, that man you see there, russia's top diplomat, he is now taking an active role in trying to end the civil war in syria. now, remember, both russia and china have blocked u.n. attempts to force out the assad regime. now the russians say they are willing to meet with the syrian opposition. it could open the door for real u.n. action on the ground, action that could mean american involvement. we've got more details in a live report in just a minute. >>> but also, russia's president formally saying no to americans who want to adopt russian children. it is a heartbreaking development for hundreds of americans who are trying to adopt children from russian orphana orphanages. that is happening right now. president vladimir putin signed the adoption ban today. sadly, more than 50 americans who were in the final stages of adopting russian children, they are not going to be able to. and while those families certainly hoping that they're going to allow these adoptions to go thro
heartbreak to some prospective parents here in the u.s. in the process of adopting children from russia. president vladimir putin has signed a new law banning those adoptions, leaving shocked adults and children wondering what will happen next. here is nbc's kerry sanders. >> reporter: cindy and dennis boyer were weeks away from adopting baby adeline. they met the almost 2-year-old recently as they visited her russian orphanage. but now vladimir putin has signed a law that despite mounds of paperwork and thousands of dollars already spent, all the more than 1,500 adoptions currently under way and any future adoptions are permanently cancelled. >> she's for a home, ready for a family, ready to be loved. >> reporter: why the new adoption law signed so publicly? russian authorities say some of the adopted have been abused or died. one unruly boy was even sent back on a plane alone to russia. also at play here say u.s. experts, retaliation. a visa ban on russian officials accused of human rights violations. >> they're retaliating by holding hostage orphans that otherwise would have homes in
and nancy cordes. elaine quijano on the family heartbreak after russia's president bans all adoptions to americans. >> we ask president putin, please, can he set an alternate means but don't let me children suffer. >> glor: he met saddam hussein and made it look easy. david martin on the death of general norman schwarzkopf and what the world did not know about him. and "on the road" with steve hartman as a man tries to save his wife of 56 years. an unusual request that gets a surprising response. >> got two of them and i only need one. captioning sponsored by cbs this is the "cbs evening news" with scott pelley. >> glor: good evening, scott is off tonight. i'm jeff glor. it is the end of a holiday week, but it would appear congress is just getting started. tonight, the president said he is mottestly optimistic about a deal to avoid the fiscal cliff, which would mean avoiding automatic tax increases and spending cuts come, you know, 1. the president spoke to the nation this evening after an hour-long meeting with congressional leaders at the white house. democrat and republican leaders
stakeholders' liked iran and russia. >>thank you for your answers. i'm looking for something a little bit more specific. what is the relation between the new coalition and the military council? do you think they can become an administrative body for the revolution or a government in exile as you just described? >> is there a follow-up question? >> the new coalition actually put three things they have to do. the first to form a new government and to form a military council, and in the third thing the to play a role in the humanitarian assistance or humanitarian aid. the debate right now within the new coalition, are we able to form a government until we get it in guarantees from the international community, suc. restated three examples before of government in exile. if there is no recognition of the international community, there is nothing the government in exile can do. the second thing is the financial assistance. i said before, after the formation of the serbian national council, six months we don't have what we need to do. you cannot work as a workin exile with individual budgets. the rela
to be retaliation for a new u.s. law that targets human rights abuses in russia. in the past two decades, more , mo 60,000 russian children have been given new homes inside the u.s. it elaine quijano met one family whose adoption is now on hold. >> look at this. look. >> reporter: two years ago kim and robert summers decided to adopt from russia. it took nearly 18 months, but last july, the couple was matched with a 15-month-old boy. enen you saw his picture for the first time, what did you think? k i knew that this was the child i was meant to parent. and i took one look at this little ginger boy, and i fell in love with him. >> reporter: the summers began filling their new jersey home with baby clothes, a crib, and even a stroller. they traveled to his orphanage in russia twice to bond with him. >> say, hi, daddy. >> reporter: you've given him a name. >> yes. preston mackey summers. he's a wonderful young boy who needs love and attention. >> reporter: like 1,500 other american families, the summers torry that the law banning opericans from adopting russian thedren could prevent them from bringing
from one nation to the next. it's about to happen in russia. where moscow is going to approve a ban on american couples only from adopteding russian children. we just improved our trade relations with them, why are they doing this? have our relations with the putin regime deteriorated that much? senior fellow with the center of transatlantic relations at johns hopkins university. what is this really about? >> this is about vladimir putin playing to his base which is nationalistic and poor as he's losing moscow and it's about vladimir putin sending a signal to the united states that he does not want us interfering in russia's internal affairs and this is a convenient way to send that message. >> let's, explain why they would think that with this trade status improvement there was a little clause that said if someone violates human rights in russia you're not going to be able to get a vase to get in here. what is this law called? >> the magity insky bill. >> sergei died in prison. who helped kill him. >> the reason he was in prison, he's a lawyer. he was defending a guy who is a frequ
russia as russia's president signs an adoption ban. stop! stop! stop! come back here! humans -- we are beautifully imperfect creatures living in an imperfect world. that's why liberty mutual insurance has your back with great ideas like our optional better car replacement. if your car is totaled, we give you the money to buy one a model year newer. call... and ask one of our insurance experts about it today. hello?! we believe our customers do their best out there in the world, and we do everything we can to be there for them when they need us. [car alarm blaring] call now and also ask about our 24/7 support and service. call... and lock in your rate for 12 months today. liberty mutual insurance. responsibility. what's your policy? >>> nasty, nasty, nasty winter storm has eased, but it left a lot of the u.s. covered with snow. maine was the last to feel the brunt of the snowstorm, which hammered the midwest and south just this week. some areas of maine saw up to ten inches of snow overnight, forcing state offices to close. the bad weather not over yet. northeast bracing for more sn
uncertain. billionaire investor and russia's wealthiest man alisher usmanov told cnbc's geoff cutmore that rebalance of growth is need. >> 2013 will be a year where we need to search for solutions. there is a big discussion going on about the state of the global economy. everyone is involved in that debate, in that discussion about wa to do. governments, central banks, economists, businessmen, scholars. so as far as i'm concerned, what really worried me and what i think is the real cause of the uncertainty is the enormous disparity that exists between the various monetary and other derivatives on the one hand and the global gdp. the derivatives, surpass many, many times the global gdp. there is too much of that. a mechanism needs to be found to reduce this disparity, minimize it. this is the cause of the instability, the volatility, of stagnation and sometimes even political crisis. so some mechanism to get out of this disparity will need to be found. and so what i'm hoping is that in 2013, the central banks of the united states, europe, and china will find a solution to at stop the g
saws russia because they grow during the war and the soviet union, don't forget the arm themselves across the mountains and we make themselves. it's an extraordinary story. migration and reconstruction and dedication of the people and of the losses of the soviets with this 22 or 27 million the stalin's it doesn't matter they plunged into this thing and it was a crucible for them at the war. but the british churchill has a fascinating overlay on this because he has a different motive it seems. once the british islands are saved in the battle of britain his goal seems to be truly to regain the empire. he said i do not mean to dismember the british empire. and the whole -- the whole concept of going to north africa, sending troops into the southern belly of the nazi empire, italy and the balkans, regaining greece which is a tremendous story. everyone talks about eastern europe. as an outsider i see what about the british when they went back into greece in 1944 and started bombing the streets of athens and killing the people, the communist resistors that fought against the nazis. the b
the british empire. we are cutting power, so does russia because they grow during the war. they arm themselves and remake themselves. it's an extraordinary story. migration and deconstruction and the losses of the soviets, whether it's 22 or 20 million, doesn't matter. the idea of the whole nation plunged into this thing. it was a crucible for them. a great war. but the british -- churchill has a different motive. once the british islands are saved by the -- in the battle of britain, is goal seems to be to regain the empire. he said i did not become prime minister to dismember the british empire, and the whole consent of going into north africa, sending troops to the belly of the nazi empire, regaining greece, which is a tremendous story -- everyone talks about eastern europe. what bet the british when they went back into greece in 1944 and started dive-bombing the streets of athen and killing'm residents who fought against the nazis and that's never pointed out. look at what stalin did in poland. he broke this and that. i don't believe he broke yalta. look what the british did. no one ever po
over internet use and content. the changes were supported by 89 countries including russia, china, and saudi arabia. >> coming up, as egypt prepares to vote, why is the new constitution so divisive? we will talk about that. >> the fate of children in afghanistan as nato troops prepare to withdraw. >> stay with us. >> welcome back, everyone. each faces a tense weekend. voting begins on a controversial constitution supported by president mohamed morsi. it has deeply divided the country. >> opposition groups are urging supporters to vote against it. morsi oppose the muslim brotherhood is calling on egyptians to support the document. -- morsi's muslim brotherhood is calling the egyptians to support the document. >> opponents said the document does not do enough to protect women and minorities. the leading activist has asked egypt's president to delay the referendum. >> it is shaping up to be a pivotal moment for the country which has witnessed daily violence in the run-up to the referendum. >> we want to get a closer look at some of the most disputed articles of the new constitution.
others. >> russia's president could soon decide if americans should be ban from adopting russian children. the government voted in favor of such a ban. russian activists say it deprives children of the chance to leave orphanages. it's a response to a united states law calling for sanctions against russia. >>> today marks the 8th anniversary of the quake and tsunami. survivors held prayer services. the un called it the worst natural disaster to hit thailand. tsunami's went through 14 countries. 200,000 people died. >> we are back on storm watch this day after christmas. mark is tracking a fast moving storm that has produced plenty of rain. >> and we check the return polesis of major stores. what you need to know before you return that unwanted gift. >> here is a look at bridge. you can see it's wet. we will let you know where we had spin outs this morning coming up next. . >>> this is known as boxes day in places like canada. it's become a huge shopping day similar to black friday here in the united states. the malls in england and canada are already packed with shoppers. box i
there might be a point now where we can start cooperating with russia on an eventual syria outcome, a syria without assad. in my view we need to look for a place to cooperate with russia. there are lot ss of areas where our interests intersect. this may be one of them. >> thank you very much, general myers. >>> political crisis in egypt is growing, planning a general strike and massive rally outside the presidential palace. several egyptian newspapers didn't print today. private tv networks plan to shut down tomorrow. holly williams is watching it all from cairo. >> reporter: president morsi's opponents say today's protest is a final warning to the president and his islamist allies. they're expecting tens of thousands of people, perhaps more. and some of them will march on to the presidential palace. this follows days of political turmoil here in egypt, including protests, violent clashes. protesters are angry about two things. firstly, president morsi's power grab of 12 days ago in which he gave himself sweeping new authority, including immunity from the court. secondly
is russia because they grow during the war. don't forget they armed themselves and they remake themselves. it's an extraordinary story of migration reconstruction and dedication to the people in the losses of the soviets, whether it's 22 or 27 million whether stalin kills, doesn't matter. the ideas the whole nation plunged and there was a crucible for them, a great war. the british, churchill is a fascinating overlay on this because he has a different motive it seems. once the british islands are saved by the battle of britain, his goal seems to be truly to regain the empire. he said it did not become prime minister to dismember the british empire. and the whole concept of going to north africa, sending troops off to the southern nazi empire in italy in the balkans, regaining greece which is a tremendous story. ever in talks about history of europe and as an outsider i'm saying what about the british when they went back in 1944 and started divebombing the streets of athens and killing the people, communists are sisters who thought -- fought valiantly against the nazis. the british were
an approximation. >> this week the secretary of state hillary clinton, she met with russia's foreign minister and the u.n. special envoy to syria. as you know, russia has blocked action against al assad at the u.n., but some have speculate that had moscow may be considering a different aprove. i mean, is russia stopping the u.s., do you think, from going into syria? >> i think the russians are beginning to realize that this problem simply cannot be ignored, and their passive stance on it simply doesn't provide for any constructive solution, so i hope that they will work with us on this, and i think the more international consensus we have on what is to be done, the less likely is the danger that the removal of the regime will result in the fragmentation of syria all together and regional conflicts erupting. that is the real danger, and that's what people should be concentrating on. >> you know, some have made the comparison that getting involved with syria or in syria is similar to us getting involved in libya and taking action against libya. do you see it that way? >> not quite. i supported
or three books and notepad and if for instance it is the week before the invasion of russia, mid june of 1941, i've got all the diaries piled up next to one chair, another of all the recollections, speeches churchill may have made, telegrams to roosevelt, warnings to stalin. and i approached it and i told bill phillips this -- host: your editor? guest: yes, my editor bill tphreupls. as if i was making a quilt. and i think this got a little off in the "new york times" artic article, that i would focus on that story that week, the invasion of russia. well, there was always something else happening that week, too. now we've two or three stories that have to be intertwined and i can't go down too far in the road to august of 1941 with the russian front and ca come all the way back to june 20 then go down to august with the african front. it wouldn't work. so, a read a lot. i bought harriman's memoirs. bill man westchester, in his notes, would xerox a page and cut out a little paragraph and 50 pages later you may find another paragraph from harriman's family worries but there was no contex
, it is the week before the invasion of russia, june 1941, i have all the diaries piled up next to one share. all of the recollections, the speeches churchill may have made, the telegrams to roosevelt, the warnings to stalin -- i approached it and i told bill phillips -- >> as your editor. >> my editor, bill phillips, as if i was making a quilt. this got a little off in the " new york times" article, but focusing on that week, the invasion of russia, there is always something else happening that week, so now we have two or three stories that have to be intertwined, and you cannot go too far down the road into august with the russian front and then come all the way back to june 20 again and then go all the way down to august with the african front and -- it would not work. so i read a lot. i bought the memoirs. bill manchester in his notes had xeroxed a page and cut out a paragraph. 50 pages later you might find another paragraph from the memoirs. but there is no contrast -- what team before and what came afterward. clearly bill wanted to paraphrase something from that excerpt, which kind of point
, in one of those machines where you use the claw to scoop up a toy. this one in russia. >> no word on how that kitty claimed her cozy spot there. she seemed content even when the claw nearly grabs her. i have never successfully gotten anything out of those machines. i never can maneuver it right to do it. >> it's operator error. >> i'm sure, probably. >>> and it's the big, new destination for a las vegas wedding. it's the new 24-hour denny's, right there in downtown sin city. >> now, in addition to the wedding chapel inside, there's also a full-service bar, of course, for those who want to get hitched right there at denny's. they're offering a variety of marital packages, includes a cake made of bacon and a marriage. and moons over my hammy. a grand slam of a marriage. >> you can do it all there at denny's. i love it. >>> for some of you, now, your local news, coming up next. >> for everyone else, we'll be back in a moment with a look at the royal babies through the years. on ♪ ♪ every little thing is possible now ♪ [ female announcer ] we've added a touch of philadelphia cream chee
into exile. >> bill: because russia has been syria's main ally. >> absolutely. backing it all the way. there again this is our man. we're not going to look like obama did. we're not going to go back down. obama backed down on mubarak. the russians see that as a sign of weakness. we're sticking with our guy. the rebels are advancing. they're getting increasingly armed first from external sources but also from the bases they captured so they've got heavy equipment now. we talked about this last week. tanks, anti-aircraft that -- weapons that have downed two syrian aircraft in the last two weeks. so you see the assad forces falling back. they're in a fight for damascus at this point. so a lot of the heavy shelling that's going on, it isn't going on up north in aleppo. the syrian army has retreated from the northern and eastern provinces. they're battling for damascus at this point. >> bill: will he be the first dictator to use chemical weapons since saddam hussein? >> saddam hussein used them. his father is rumored to h
. even russia, syria's most powerful ally, is alarmed. their foreign minister met yesterday with secretary hillary clinton discussing the possibility of a syria without assad in power. >> wow. >> this morning rebels have declared damascus's airport a military target, warning civilians and airlines not to approach it. >> richard, that's what we're looking at. we're looking at russia to see when russia finally gives up on assad. if they are, in fact, coming close, it's over. he's done. >> that's the beginning of the end. and i think that's finally in play. brahimi who preceded kofi annan trying to do a diplomatic process finally, i think, has something to work with. it's the possibility of the threat that the syrian regime might turn to chemical munitions, and the russians realize that would be the equivalent of jumping and that their long-term equities. the russians realize that would be too far, not on moral grounds, but on real politic rounds. so the chances of telling the syrians don't do it, but the russians saying if you do it, you won't be supported. and possibly giving
? because we've seen reports about, you know, wealthy migrants and specialists visas, coming to russia and the chinese who. are the people that are happy to buy? >> it makes a very, very small -- buying in the streets in central london. >> you might be right. >> so that's not the market. certainly not the figures that land registry are talking about there in terms of a slowdown. the slowdown is it's sort of normal people working here, including overseas. we rely on a large overseas highly skilled professional contingent who are here, or educated here. and they're the people who are either -- buying and trying to get their first homes, or sort of moving up. it's very little to buy. >> how different is the short-term prognosis for the long-term? you sponsored this report. michael ball in business school, who said that in the end, property prices in particular were meant to go nowhere but up. why is he arguing that? >> the issue is that london is a growing city and we want it to grow and the economy to grow. the fact that we're not building, the green belt is constraining us, so we've got
of resolution to this war in syria that has lasted nearly two years long. russia a big supporter of the bashar al-assad, the russian foreign minister met with secretary clinton in bu dublin. she felt the meeting upbeat thinking there may be a come proeu myself in th compromise in the future. right now there is nothing concrete and syrians continue to die. >> reporter: with every step forward the opposition makes in syria it raises concerns that a cornered president bashar al-assad could be more likely to use those chemical weapons that are apparently loaded and ready to drop. lieutenant general tom mcnerney is a fox news military analyst and served as vice chief of staff of the united states air force. thanks so much for being here. intelligence reports suggest that bashar al-assad is making moves to putting together and readying these chemical weapons. you'll remember that president obama in august said that he would consider that a red line, and the u.s. would have to get involved if bashar al-assad were to do that. do you think that the u.s. stance is the same today? >> well, i think it is,
are right now and have a long, extended war? >> and if we are waiting on russia to come around and pave the way, similar to that in the case of libya, do you think that will pay off? >> i don't think so. it's hard to imagine russia at this point anyway, from my vantage point, maybe i'll be proved wrn ed wrong, approving u.n. resolution. even in the latest talks that hillary clinton has had, it's not like it's suddenly kumbaya and everybody's on the same page. they're not. obviously the russians are la looking at this very closely because they can tell that their client, assad, is in a very tricky situation. but by the very same token, the u.s. without being involved now really has not many friends on the ground in syria. so what happens if assad somehow falls? who do you then talk to? who do you then have relations with on the ground? i know they've come up with a coalition, this opposition coalition. but that too has yet to fully prove itself as an effective and consolidated opposition to bashar assad. and not just that, a coalition that can encourage his core group of supporters to de
. >>> this is what happens when you park illegally in russia. we just found this video. a great big truck with a great big claw picking up a car. it seems sensible. seems like a reasonable ex expenditure expenditure. >> where does it go? >> immediately in the back of the truck. >> to immediately strip it down. >> hopefully to recycling. welcome back to "cbs this morning," everyone. >>> a suburban newspaper is in the middle of controversy after it put up everyone's name and address who has a gun permit. >> it quickly spread around the internet. as jim axelrod reports, critics say it's too much information. >> reporter: driving through this typical westchester neighborhood, you can tell a lot, who's got a new car, who just finished their addition who's got the best christmas ornament ornaments. now thanks to this website you also might fwhoe has a handgun. it began as an 1,800-world article in this past sunday's edition of "the journal news" that covers three counties. included in the article included a map with names and addresses of those likely to own a handgun in
springsteen labor secretary? i think she should be ambassador to russia -- no i'm kidding. no, really judge. david: i want to come to the judge's side here. think of great britain, world war ii. guess who fdr had as his ambassador? joseph kennedy, he hired a bootlegger to be the ambassador to the u.k. >> a bootlegger that said don't resist hitler -- david: exactly a bootlegger who was cozying up to adolf hitler. i'm not justifying it, but i'm just saying going way back to world war ii. >> to your point, presidents have been wrong to treat this with a lack of seriousness. to treat it as if it's a social job rather than a political legal intelligence job. and we all know that not everybody that works in those embassies is not without intelligence experience and connections, without getting into more detail than i need to be. stuart: than you need to be, right. liz: like i said, she should be ambassador to russia -- no i'm kidding. david: if sean becomes ambassador of venezuela. we blame you. we love you, but we blame you. >> is he serious about this? stuart: in this news report, two people su
with tonight's outer circle, where we reach out to our sources around the world. as russia's president made a rare appearance in turkey today, to meet with the country's prime minister. they pulled nonessential staff from the area. clashes continue along the border of those two countries. ivan watson is is in istanbul and i asked him how close the latest syrian air strikes were to the turkish border. >> the air strikes hit within site of the turkish border, sending panicked civilians fleeing to the nearby turkish border, also sending warplanes in the air in response to these close air strikes. all of this happening just hours before one of the biggest traditional supporters. vladimir putin sat down for talks with the turkish prime minister who's been one of the biggest enemies. both leaders trying to down play their difference, play up their huge trade, but they disagree on turkey's request to deploy patriot missile batteries along the border. eat enough food, making her strong enough to get through this early stage of the pregnancy. she'll be worried the information is out already, because
. not on the list is the two biggest military supports, russia and iran. on britain sky news today, assad's envoy deputy foreign minister denied the report. and said the president will not leave syria and assad will stay in power. >> do you think your government will still be in power a year from now? >> i am sure, yes. >> reporter: nato announced a limited number of u.s. troops and patriot missile will join the german and turkish troops on the border to prevent syria attacking turkey. >> bret: thank you. opponents of egyptian president mohammed morsi reportedly torched the headquarters of the muslim brotherhood in a city east of cairo today. outside the presidential palace in the capital, thousands of islamist supporter of president morsi chased away opposition protesters who later returned in big numbers. fighting with rocks, fire bombs and sticks. tragic scenes tonight in philippines. stunned parents searching through a reof mud-stained bodies looking for missing children lost. the storm killed nearly 300 people in the southern philippines, including 78 villagers who perished during a flash fl
into a global conflict lasting seven years, involve england, franch, austria, russia, prussia, and dozen other nations fighting for control over colonies in north america, africa, asia, and the seas in between. the seven years war changed the map of the world shifting national borders in europe, in africa, in india, and elsewhere. it leveled thousands of towns and villages in europe. killed or maimed more than a million soldiers and civilians, and bankrupted a dozen nations including england and france. remember, it started in britain's north american colonies, and the british government and british people naturally thought british subjects in british north america should share the costs of the war with their fellow citizens in britain. in fact, the government raised property taxes so high in britain that farmers rioted in protest and demanded that americans pay their fair share of the war. in 17 # 64, the british government extended to the colonies a stamp tax that everyone in britain had been paying for more than 70 years. it amounted to next to nothing for the average citizen, a pepny or tw
the situations in eastern europe and russia where most guns are banned. hasn't cut down on gun violence, however. as those countries have a higher murder rate than the usa. also the gun murder rate here in america has almost been cut in half in the past 20 years. talking points wants a sane country with smart public safety measures. do we need semiautomatic rifles to be easily available? that's a worthy debate. and there are strong points on each side. clearly we the people, have to take a tough look at our violent society and find some effective solutions without violating constitutional rights. a very difficult situation, but we have to try. that's a memo. now for the top story, reaction. joinings from phoenix, alan gottlieb, founder of the second amendment foundation, national rifle association, would not provide, would not provide a spokesperson this evening. so do you have any give at all? is there any area that you would compromise as far as new laws making it more difficult to obtain certain weapons? >> first, bill, let me say i thought your talk points were really excellent. >> thank you
in the crowd in new york city on new year's eve. >>> a fatal plane crash in russia, the impact sending debris flying into oncoming traffic. >>> a scary slip on a frozen lake in the moun tapetains of southern california became a race to save a life. >>> and kim carkardashian is pregnant. >>> intercepted by rob jackson. redskins into the playoffs. rg3. maybe he can solve the fiscal cliff. >>> and all that matters. >> fireworks lit up sydney harbor, beautiful, as people mark the start of 2013. happy new year. >> on "cbs this morning." >>> chuck pagano back on the colts sideline yesterday cancer free as the colts won 28-16. >> i feel so blessed to be back with you guys in the battle. thank you. thank you so much. captioning funded by cbs >>> welcome to "cbs this morning." i'm norah o'donnell with anthony mason. as we wake up the deadline to the fiscal cliff is just 14 hours ai wa. there's no deal yet, but members of congress are heading back to capitol hill. first, breaking news on the condition of secretary of state hillary clinton. >> she's in a new york city hospital
numbers were being sent to russia to die. when the germans surrendered and the japanese were pushed back to their home island, the american propensity to save the human lives while wasting cheaper bullets and bombs reached its zenith with the dropping of the two atomic bombs. virtually all of the relevant evidence, recent evidence from both american and japanese sources nowadays president harry truman's decision to drop both bombs. japanese leaders did not display the slightest acknowledgment of military reality, illustrated by the report of a doctor. japan's top atomic scientist who was sent down to the regime of the following day and he had to report back to the emperor. and he was asked was this an atomic bomb? yes, it's an atomic bomb. then came the line, how long till we get when? it's hardly the response of somebody looking for a way to surrender. truman intended to show japan that he would use any weapon at our disposal. there was no atomic diplomacy. he wanted to show the japanese that it was surrender or die. when japan 70, came the victory of the principles of american exceptio
in southern russia of some significance in 1774. so there must of had a lot of troops left over. they were approached obviously early in 1775. by june 1775, there is a report in one of the virginia newspapers that the crown was tried to hire russians. and they thought that -- that they had arranged, but it fell apart in the autumn of 1775, partly because frederick the great was telling catherine the great not to do it. and they were not fond of the notion of letting troops to go through german territory. at any event, it did not happen. after that, they had to turn to there werens -- the haiti about 50,000 german mercenaries, not all of the same time. >> i am jumping here, but, in the end, why do the patriots win? >> i think they won partly because it was such a challenge for the british from the start, the logistics' were enormously difficult, the number of the ships they needed, the number of troops. they did not have them. but even more than that, you had 13 colonies, large population, a number of them -- they had a lot of people who fought in previous wars. the british were not able to
occasionally to rent out. they had a war in southern russia of some significance in 1774, so they must of had a lot of troops left over that they had organized for that. they were approached early in 1775. by june of 1775 there's a report in one of the virginia newspapers that the crown is trying to hire russians. they thought they had it arranged, but it's all part then -- but it fell apart in the autumn of 1775 partly because frederick the great was telling catherine the great not to do it. there were not friendly to the notion of letting troops go through german territory. in any event, it did not happen. after that, they had returned to the hessians. they came from a number of german states. probably a total of 50,000 german mercenaries during the revolution all and all. >> in the end, why did the colonists or why did the patriots went? -- win? >> i think they won partly because it was such a challenge for the british. from the british the logistics were enormously difficult. the number of ships they needed, the number of troops, but did not have them. even more than that, you had 13 colo
technologies. we have to sustain the partnerships we have. and that includes russia. we're joined by some of our russian friends here today. russia's said our current agreement hasn't kept pace with the changing relationship between our countries to which we say, let's update it. let's work with russia as an equal partner. let's continue the work that's so important to the security of both our countries. i'm optimistic that we can. we have to keep creating new partnerships. we have to make sure to paraphrase einstein that our wisdom stays ahead of our technology. and i know you're committed to this. and i want you to know that i am, too. so let me leave you with a story of that first trip dick and i took together. you may remember this, dick. i was in ukraine. we went to a facility, an old factory. we walked down these long, dark corridors, ducking our heads, stepping over puddles of something. we're not sure what it was. finally we came across some women sitting at a worktable. on it were piles of old artillery shells. and the women were sitting there taking them apart by hand, slowly, c
a raisyour rate cd. ally bank. your money needs an ally. >>> as russia's president made a rare appearance in turkey today, clashes continue along the border of those two countries. ivan watson is is in istanbul and i asked him how close the latest syrian air strikes were to the turkish border. >> the air strikes hit within site of the turkish border, sending panicked civilians fleeing to the nearby turkish border, also sending warplanes in the air in response to these close air strikes. all of this happening just hours before one of the biggest traditional supporters. vladimir putin sat down for talks with the turkish prime minister who's been one of the biggest enemies. both leaders trying to down play their difference, play up their huge trade, but they disagree on turkey's request to deploy batteries along the border and this is supposed to be disgust at nato headquarters starting on tuesday. >>> let's check in now with john king with a look at what's ahead on ac 360. >> the united nations now reacting to the story you're also been covering. syria may be preparing to unleash chemical w
and russia are urging the north koreans don't follow through with another launch. saying this would violate united nations security council restrictions. well, it's now early morning in egypt and the nation is bracing for a day of potentially enormous demonstrations against the president's recent power grab there protesters have been rallying against president mohammed morsi for two weeks ever since he granted himself near absolute authority. a few days ago. lawmakers who support morsi hastily drafted and then passed a brand new constitution that could strengthen his grip. keep in mind president morsi of egypt has a lot of followers. he won a democratic election earlier thisser i don't. he is effectively making himself a dictator and the fact point to exactly that today 11 of egypt's largest newspapers suspended all operations over upcoming referendum vote. steve harrigan live in cairo for us. steve? >> shepard, these opposition protesters behind me on tahrir square are calling for people to marchionne the presidential palace tomorrow. that raises a clear possibility of conflict with suppor
sharon, where was he from? >> russia originally. he still speaks russian. not great russian but passable russian. >> moshe dayan? >> in holland. >> shimon peres? >> poland. still has a polish accent. that is often a humor in israel. good thing i remember these things. >> ok. we're leading up to 1967. by the way, did israel win 1956? >> israel won the 1956 militarily. there was a pattern always in israeli diplomatic history. they win them militarily but cannot necessarily win them diplomatically, politically. so was the case in 19 4r8. they won an overwhelming victory over the arabs but yet didn't secure the one thing that most victorious countries achieve in a war. it didn't achieve peace. it didn't end the state of war. 1956, israel decimated the egyptian army, decimated the egyptian air force and yet did not achieve peace, again. 1967, one of the great military victories in all history, in terms of the amount of material lost bit arabs, the men lost, the territory sacrificed by the arab forces, it was an overwhelming victory. did israel achieve peace in 1967? no. >> so actually as you
there was so much going on in the world with the arab spring, with the protests in russia, on wall street that there was something in the air. that we've seen all through this year that some spirit of rebellion, some spirit of rebellion against the establishment and i wanted to try to tap into that. >> rose: tim cook was a finalist was he? >> tim cook came by for an interview last week. part of it was animated by the fact that steve jobs famously bemoan it had fact that he was never person of the year and i thout -- rose: why wn't ? >> well, i guess the timing was never right he thought he was going to be person of the year in 1984. that the computer was going to be the thing of the year and i thought about steve last year but, of course, he died during the year. we've never put a dead person as person of the year before and i didn't think that was a great -- >> rose: so you missed the opportunity so therefore -- >> so therefore i thought -- i wanted people to look at tim cook. he's had an hay maizing year, he's doubled the market cap of apple since steve died. the number ofaches over the
christmas tree in the kremlin. it's the biggest in russia. designers decorated it using a patriotic theme mixing the colors of the russian flag, red, white, and blue. and finally, syria. in a country now engaged in civil war these peaceful christmas scenes stand in stark contrast. true spirit of christmas, peace, joy, somehow in the middle of the chaos syrians taking a few precious moments to remember. well, we all know the song even if we don't know all the words. 12 days of christmas except of course 5 golden rings we know. this christmas those rings, everything else on the list there, a lot more expensive making the 12 days of christmas a very expensive tradition especially in these struggling times. richard qwest from london is adding up the tab. >> reporter: so you've decided to be very traditional in your christmas presents this year. and you're going to buy the 12 days of christmas. you know, all the items that are in the song well pnc bank has worked out how much it will cost and it is 5% more expensive this year than last year. and this is why. let's start with the partridge in a
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